1300 I Street NW, Washington, DC 20005

(202)766-5433 info@a3alliance.org

Global Health

Health promotion is very relevant today. There is a global acceptance that health and social well-being are determined by many factors outside the health system which include socioeconomic conditions, patterns of consumption associated with food and communication, demographic patterns, learning environments, family patterns, the cultural and social fabric of societies; socio-political and economic changes, including commercialization and trade and global environmental change. In such a situation, health issues can be effectively addressed by adopting a holistic approach by empowering individuals and communities to take action for their health, fostering leadership for public health, promoting intersectoral action to build healthy public policies in all sectors and creating sustainable health systems.

Within this framework, we developed several health programs and models. Each model is designed to reach a specific group of people, address a particular health issue and guide program development in a variety of settings. A3 works with community members and community organizations to select the most appropriate model and adapt it to the community and to local circumstances. The rationale behind this approach is that it would help overcome social variability and ensure that actions are most relevant to local conditions and needs. We believe this is a good start. We aim to improve the quality of health services by promoting partnerships and strengthening collaboration between local and regional health providers.

Health Promotion Specific Interventions

  1. Provide planned, organized, and structured activities and events over time that focus on helping individuals make informed decisions about their health
  2. Promote policy, environmental, regulatory, organizational, and legislative changes at various levels of governments and organizations.
  3. Promote partnership to work with health professionals and healthcare organizations who share some common characteristics related to the health concern being addressed.
  4. Developing a health promotion data bank to gather information about a priority population’s health concerns, needs, and desires at regional levels.
  5. Engaging the schools, workplaces, healthcare organizations, and communities, where people live and work as partners in the process of promoting health, is most effective.

Modules for Health Promotion Programs

  1. Health Education To Improve  (Health Knowledge, Health Attitudes, Health Skills, Health Behaviors, Health Indicators, Health Status).
  2. Environmental Actions to Promote (Advocacy, Environmental Change, Legislation, Policy Mandates, Regulations, Resource Development, Social Support, Financial Support, Community Development, Organizational Development).

Sites for Health Promotion Programs

  1. Schools: childcare; preschool; kindergarten; elementary, middle, and high schools; two-year and four-year colleges; universities; and vocational-technical programs.
  2. Workplaces: encourage and support employees’ health practices (smoking, lack of physical activity, and poor nutritional habits adversely affect the health and productivity of their employees).
  3. Healthcare organizations: community hospitals, specialty hospitals, community health centers, physician offices, clinics, rehabilitation centers, skilled nursing and long-term care facilities
  4. Communities: community centers, Community Development Councils, Community Development Groups.

 

  1. Workplace health Promotions
  2. Community Health Promotion
  3. School Health Promotion
  4. Health Promotion Resource Center
  5. Health Promotion Quarterly Magazine
  6. Untold Stories
  7. Saluting Unseen Champions

 

  1. Workplace health Promotions

The workplace is an important setting for health protection, health promotion, and disease prevention programs.  While employers have a responsibility to provide a safe and hazard-free workplace, they also have abundant opportunities to promote individual health and foster a healthy work environment for employees.

We developed policies and programs to reduce health risks and improve the quality of life for everyone in the workplace. We assist organizations by providing employer-based training to maintain a healthier workforce with lower direct costs such as insurance premiums and worker’s compensation claims. It will also positively impact many indirect costs such as absenteeism and worker productivity.

To improve the health of their employees, businesses can create a wellness culture that is employee-centered; provides supportive environments where safety is ensured and health can emerge and provides access and opportunities for their employers to engage in a variety of workplace health programs.

We provide a coordinated and comprehensive set of strategies which include programs, policies, benefits, environmental supports, and links to the surrounding community designed to meet the health and safety needs of all employees.

Examples of our workplace health promotion program include:

  • Health education classes
  • Local fitness facilities
  • Policies that promote healthy behaviors such as a tobacco-free campus policy
  • Affordable health insurance coverage for appropriate preventive screenings
  • Guideline on work environment free of recognized health and safety threats with a means to identify and address new problems as they arise

Facilitating monthly workshop to encourage employees to become the healthiest in their lives and reduce the cost of healthcare for their employers. It includes nutrition education, weight management, tobacco cessation, stress management, onsite fitness, and other services. Often called wellness programs but this is beyond physical health and includes emotional and spiritual health.

We provide research-based tools and resources to help employers develop or expand a workplace health promotion program that supports their employees’ physical, mental, emotional, and financial well-being.

  1. Community Health Promotion

Health care systems in many developing countries have shared characteristics. Government expenditures in poor countries are low for health care. The majority of people cannot easily reach a modern health facility. Most spending is for high-cost curative medicine and hospitals. Programs are often inefficient in their use of funds.

The tragedy of disease in developing countries is that many of the most serious problems are either preventable or curable by simple, inexpensive, safe methods. More than 70 percent of almost 11 million child deaths every year are attributable to six causes: diarrhea, malaria, neonatal infection, pneumonia, preterm delivery, or lack of oxygen at birth. These deaths occur mainly in the developing world. A3 bases all of its work in partnerships with local health providers to provide two-thirds of the needed services, including supervision of pregnancy, midwifery, care of new-born children, treatment of endemic diseases, and emergency care for needy people. In addition improvements in nutrition, hygiene, and sanitation are needed to reach the full health potential of most communities.

There are not many health insurance plans for the underprivileged community. They have to pay out of pocket if they need any medical treatment but due to the limited or no resources, the majority is unable to afford treatment expenses which include medical tests, medications, hospital stay and other expenses. It is almost impossible for someone who earns less than $2 a day to pay the hefty amount for medical relief. There is also lack of advanced medical facilities and medical professionals due to which lower-middle-class families are unable to avail treatment facilities.

Within this framework, we developed several community health programs and models. Each model is designed to reach a specific group of people, address a particular health issue and guide program development in a variety of settings. To create a local program, A3 works with community members and community organizations to select the most appropriate model and adapt it to the community and to local circumstances. The rationale behind this approach is that it would help overcome social variability and ensure that actions are most relevant to local conditions and needs.

We believe this is a good start. We aim to improve the quality of health services by promoting partnerships and strengthening collaboration between local and regional health providers. A3 organize and support health care programs in rural and urban areas to benefit the poor people in developing countries.

  • Organizing free medical camps in different locations to take the medical facilities to the unreached. The package camps cover; Cardiology, Dental, Gynecology, Pediatrics, Ophthalmic, Dermatology, General Medicine,
  • Rural or urban polyclinic (there are no advanced healthcare services in most urban and rural areas due to which majority of people traveling to a country other than their own to obtain medical treatment in their areas).
  • Referral hospitals; in partnership with primary and secondary healthcare providers, referring patients to the hospitals with a well-functioning health care system at regional and international level.
  1. School Health Promotion

Schools have a great influence on the health status of young people and make a positive long-term impact on the development of new approaches to school-based health promotion programs. We developed a comprehensive whole-school approach which includes an objective to increase the proportion of elementary, middle, and senior high schools that provide comprehensive school health education to prevent health problems in the following areas: unintentional injuries, violence, suicide, tobacco use and addiction, alcohol or other drug use, HIV/AIDS, unhealthy dietary patterns, and inadequate physical activity.

  • Improving the health and nutrition of school children.School-based programs aim to promote health and improve educational outcomes of children, targeting the poor, girls, and other disadvantaged children. Promoting good health and nutrition before and during school age is essential for effective growth and development. Low-income countries typically have more teachers than nurses and more schools than clinics. Good health and nutrition are essential for effective learning, and together, education and good health offer children the power of choice and opportunity. The provision of quality schools, textbooks and teachers can result in effective education only if the child is present, ready, and able to learn.
  • Conducting short and long-term training programs for high school students to perform clinical rounds, learn medical examination and surgical techniques, and participate in diagnosis and treatment while solving the mystery of a fatal outbreak sweeping the communities. They will grapple with controversial medical issues, learn about today’s health care challenges and explore advanced scientific research in areas such as cancer and HIV/AIDS.